Web Access Research Portal

Researcher: Hosie, GW (Dr Graham Hosie)

Fields of Research

Biological Oceanography
Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Ecology
Glaciology
Biogeography and Phylogeography
Evolutionary Biology
Chemical Oceanography

Research Objectives

Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments
Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments
Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments (excl. Social Impacts)
Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Coastal and Estuarine Environments
Social Impacts of Climate Change and Variability
Marine Oceanic Processes (excl. climate related)
Natural Hazards in Marine Environments

Career Best Publications

Research Publications

A roadmap for Antarctic and Southern Ocean science for the next two decades and beyond; Antarctic Science
Estimating the biodiversity of the East Antarctic shelf and oceanic zone for ecoregionalisation: Example of the ichthyofauna of the CEAMARC (Collaborative East Antarctic Marine Census) CAML surveys; Polar Science
Planktonic foraminiferal biogeography in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean: Contribution from CPR data; Deep-Sea Research I

Research Projects

Initial Pilot Study: The Feasibility of shipboard experimentation in the study of copepod feeding and faecal production.; Antarctic Science Advisory Committee (ASAC)
The role of herbivorous copepods in carbon flux through the Antarctic marine ecosystem; Antarctic Science Advisory Committee (ASAC)

Research Candidate Supervision

Distribution and Abundance of Larvaceans in the Southern Ocean
Planktonic interactions and particulate flux in Ellis Fjord, east Antarctica
The Spatio-temporal Distribution of Zooplankton Communities in the Southern Ocean South of Australia- High Resolution Sampling by the Continuous Plankton Recorder and its Implications for Long-term Monitoring